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A lawyer for a condominium dispute? 5 tips to find one on the French Riviera.

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The French Riviera is synonymous with the ultimate in leisure and luxury. From one of the most luxurious hotels on the planet, the Grand Hotel des Bains, to world-renowned resorts, spas, restaurants and events galore, this stretch of coastline and inland lakes is home to some of the finest attractions on earth. But what happens when your idyllic dream destination turns out to be a nightmare? In other words, what happens when your perfect property is no longer? For many people who have purchased properties in a condominium or apartment block in France’s south west provinces of Nice or Cannes, their paradise has turned into a purgatory. The reason for this is because these properties are often governed by restrictive regulations that make it almost impossible to sell or even move if you own one. However if you find yourself in this situation then don’t panic! You may not know it yet but you could be staring at your very own opportunity for salvation. That’s because as well as being able to represent owners like you in such scenarios due to our extensive experience working with all kinds of properties from single family homes through to commercial buildings and everything in between, we’re also privy to certain legal loopholes that can help us take advantage of those circumstances for the benefit of our clients instead. However before getting into specifics let’s first discuss why owning property in France might now be more trouble than it’s worth for some people too

What is a condominium or a cooperative apartment?

A condominium is essentially a type of property where the ownership is shared between the owners in a common ownership structure similar to that of a cooperative. In other words, each owner owns their own “apartement” in the building (but not the land) and shares in the overall responsibilities for the upkeep and maintenance of the block. This is quite different from a private sale where the property owner owns 100% of the property and there is no shared ownership. The French property market is extremely different from that of the UK, Australia and the US. In these other markets, residential property is almost always owned outright by the owner, and is not held as part of a shared ownership scheme. The French property model is more similar to that of Australia or the UK, where a person might buy a property as part of a shared ownership scheme and then later take out a mortgage to finance the purchase. In France, however, there is no such thing as a mortgage on a property. Instead, all property is held in a common ownership structure which means that if you own an apartment in a condominium then you’re technically “just a tenant” and not the owner of the building.

Why have so many people lost faith in selling their properties?

In the years leading up to the financial crisis, the French property market became ever more speculative as investors flooded in to take advantage of the country’s reputation for world-class luxury tourism. Prices soared and at their peak in 2014 resold property values were reaching record highs in the region of €1 million per property. Land is scarce in the area and so this led to a situation where even a modestly-priced property could be trading hands for €5 million or more. There was a serious risk of a bubble forming and bursting. This is the main reason why now you see so many people having trouble finding a way out of the property mire they’ve fallen into. In an effort to avoid a similar scenario, government officials enacted a raft of stringent new laws in 2016 that have made it almost impossible for owners to sell their property or even move. This has further fuelled the growing frustration of those who are trapped in a temporary limbo because they’ve been unable to find a way out.

The legal requirements to sell your property

There are a number of legal requirements that need to be met in order to sell your property in France. This includes registering the sale with the government, providing a completion date and date of transfer on the deed of sale, obtaining a title insurance policy, paying a transfer tax and registering the change of ownership with the authorities. If any of these requirements are missed or not completed correctly then the sale will be invalidated and you’ll have to start the whole process again. It’s also worth noting that if your home is in a collective association then the building manager may also have a say in the sale process and may try to block it or hinder it in some way.

Conditions you can use to increase the appeal of your property

In order to make it easier for buyers to come forward and purchase your property without causing too much interest you might want to consider the following ideas. This is especially the case if your property is not in great condition or is “on the market” for some other reason. – Rent-free period – If you have wavered between selling and staying another year in your home you might benefit from a rent-free period associated with the period of uncertainty. This “rent-free period” could be seen as a “softening-off” period that gives potential buyers the chance to think about their purchase and make allowances for any potential issues with the property. – Use of staff – If you have a property manager who has a say in the sale then you may be able to get round the problem by renting out your property while it is being shown to prospective buyers. This way the manager would not benefit directly from the sale but as it is not their property they could be seen by the buyer as having no vested interest in the sale not going through. – Make the most of “for sale” sign – If you have a “for sale” sign in the window then you may benefit from this. It is worth noting that if the sign is in the wrong place or does not correctly reflect how your property is for sale that this could also lead to it being rejected by buyers. – Make the most of “for sale” sign – If you have a “for sale” sign in the window then you may benefit from this. It is worth noting that if the sign is in the wrong place or does not correctly reflect how your property is for sale that this could also lead to it being rejected by buyers.

Strategies for selling your property

– Make the most of the cooling off period – This can be a huge benefit in situations where a buyer has acquired the property and then changed their mind about the deal. The French government has enacted a law that gives buyers a three-month cooling off period before they are legally liable for the deal. This means that if the deal falls through for any reason the buyer can simply walk away and the deal will be considered to be “void” and therefore not binding. If you have a buyer and they change their mind during the three-month cooling off period then you can “walk away” and walk back in to the deal as if nothing had happened. – Make the most of the three-month cooling-off period – This can be a huge benefit in situations where a buyer has acquired the property and then changed their mind about the deal. The French government has enacted a law that gives buyers a three-month cooling off period before they are legally liable for the deal. This means that if the deal falls through for any reason the buyer can simply walk away and the deal will be considered to be “void” and therefore not binding. If you have a buyer and they change their mind during the three-month cooling off period then you can “walk away” and walk back in to the deal as if nothing had happened. – Make the most of the three-month cooling-off period – This can be a huge benefit in situations where a buyer has acquired the property and then changed their mind about the deal. The French government has enacted a law that gives buyers a three-month cooling off period before they are legally liable for the deal. This means that if the deal falls through for any reason the buyer can simply walk away and the deal will be considered to be “void” and therefore not binding. If you have a buyer and they change their mind during the three-month cooling off period then you can “walk away” and walk back in to the deal as if nothing had happened. – Make the most of the three-month cooling-off period – This can be a huge benefit in situations where a buyer has acquired the property and then changed their mind about the deal. The French government has enacted a law that gives buyers a three-month cooling off period before they are legally liable for the deal. This means that if the deal falls through for any reason the buyer can simply walk away and

Besoin d’un expert en immobilier ? 5 raisons d’en engager un

‍Image Source: FreeImages‍Si vous êtes comme moi, vous avez probablement du mal à faire face à un grand nombre de choses normales liées au fait d'être propriétaire d'une maison. Qu'il s'agisse de trouver la meilleure façon de moderniser un espace désuet ou de mettre...